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Research Synthesis 2019

May 29-31, 2019, Dubrovnik, Croatia

Hotspot topics in all subfields of psychology and related areas are addressed with the aid of research synthesis methods.

  • Research Synthesis 2019

    May 29, 2019 – May 31, 2019

    organized by the Leibniz Institute for Psychology Information (ZPID) at the
    Center for Advanced Academic Studies (CAAS), Dubrovnik, Croatia


    Associated special issue, to appear 2020 in the Zeitschrift für Psychologie: Hotspots in Psychology 2020

    Associated conference, taking place May 27-29, 2019, at the same venue:
    Big Data in Psychology 2019: http://bigdata2019.leibniz-psychology.org

     

    Aims and Scope of the Conference

    Research synthesis techniques such as systematic reviews and meta-analyses have become standard methods for aggregating the results from thematically related research in psychology. They can be used to describe the state of the art in a research field, to test and/or compare theories, and to derive conclusions about the effectiveness of interventions.


    Ideally, research syntheses use transparent procedures to find, evaluate, and aggregate the results of relevant research. Procedures are explicitly defined in advance to ensure that all steps are transparent and replicable. This practice is designed to minimize bias and increase the trustworthiness of findings. Consequently, well-performed research syntheses may decisively contribute to shaping and/or resolving hotspot debates in psychology and beyond. The overall aim of this conference is to address hotspot topics in all subfields of psychology and related areas with the aid of research synthesis methods. The topics covered may address:

    • Systematic reviews aimed at identifying hotspot topics in psychology.

    • Systematic reviews and meta-analyses on topics currently being debated in any subfield of psychology.

    • Systematic reviews and meta-analyses contributing to the recent discussion about replicability, transparency, and research integrity in psychology.

    • Meta-analytic replications and extensions of previously published syntheses, for example, by applying more recent approaches and/or by including more recent primary studies.

    • Methodological advances in research synthesis methods relevant for any subfield of psychology, such as, for instance, meta-analytic structural equation modeling (MASEM), individual person meta-analysis (IPD), network meta-analysis, to name a few.

    • Demonstrations and tools to assist in data extraction for meta-analysis.

    • Demonstrations and tools facilitating community-augmented meta-analysis.

    • Quality-appraisal systems for primary, secondary, and meta-analytic studies.


    Invited Keynote Speakers

    • Christina Bergmann, Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics
      "Dynamically aggregating evidence in community-augmented meta-analyses"

    • Larry Hedges, Northwestern University
      “Meta-analytic perspectives when studying replication”

    • Terri Pigott, Loyola University Chicago
      “Power analysis in meta-analysis"

    • Wolfgang Viechtbauer, Maastricht University
      “The R package metafor: Past, present and future"


    How to submit a proposal?

    Structured abstracts could be submitted until December 1, 2018.

    Submitted contributions are also eligible to be considered for a special issue of the Zeitschrift für Psychologie (“Hotspots in Psychology 2020”). When submitting their abstract, authors were able to declare whether they would like their abstract to be considered for the conference only, or the special issue only, or both. The call for papers can be found here. Submitting a full paper for the special issue is optional for conference presenters.

    Deadlines

    Conference timeline

    Special issue timeline
    (Call for papers)

    Dec 1, 2018

    Structured abstracts due, to be submitted using this link.

    Dec 31, 2018

    Registration opens
    Invitations to present due

    Invitation to submit a full paper due

    Apr 30, 2019

    Submission of conference presentations due

    Full paper submission due

    May 29-31, 2019

    Conference in Dubrovnik

    Jul 15, 2019


    Feedback to authors of full papers due

    Aug 15, 2019

    Revised manuscripts due

    Aug 31, 2019

    Editorial decision about acceptance or refusal of revised papers due

    2020

    Publication of special issue



    Registration fees:

    Early Bird (Dec 31, 2018, until March 15, 2019):
    EUR 250.- for participants (without a presentation), EUR 150.- for presenters


    Regular (March 16, 2019, until April 15, 2019):
    EUR 300.- for participants (without a presentation), EUR 200.- for presenters


    Late (from April 16, 2019):

    EUR 350.- for participants (without a presentation), EUR 250.- for presenters



  • Research Synthesis 2018

    June 10, 2018 – June 12, 2018

    Leibniz Institute for Psychology Information (ZPID)

    Event location: University of Trier, Campus II - Kapelle (Please note that the university has two different campuses, we are at the second one!)


    Research synthesis techniques such as systematic reviews and meta-analyses have become standard methods for aggregating the results from thematically related research in psychology. They can be used to describe the state of the art in a research field, to test and/or compare theories, and to derive conclusions about the effectiveness of interventions.

    Ideally, research syntheses use transparent procedures to find, evaluate, and aggregate the results of relevant research. Procedures are explicitly defined in advance to ensure that all steps are transparent and replicable. This practice is designed to minimize bias and increase the trustworthiness of findings. Consequently, well-performed research syntheses may decisively contribute to shaping and/or resolving hotspot debates in psychology and beyond.

    The overall aim of this conference is to address hotspot topics in all subfields of psychology and related areas with the aid of research synthesis methods. The topics covered may address:

    • Systematic reviews aimed at identifying hotspot topics in psychology.
    • Systematic reviews and meta-analyses on topics currently being debated in any subfield of psychology.
    • Systematic reviews and meta-analyses contributing to the recent discussion about replicability, transparency, and research integrity in psychology.
    • Meta-analytic replications and extensions of previously published syntheses, for example, by applying more recent approaches and/or by including more recent primary studies.
    • Methodological advances in research synthesis methods relevant for any subfield of psychology, such as, for instance, meta-analytic structural equation modeling (MASEM), individual person meta-analysis (IPD), network meta-analysis, to name a few.
    • Demonstrations and tools to assist in data extraction for meta-analysis.
    • Quality-appraisal systems for primary, secondary, and meta-analytic studies.

     

    Invited Keynote Speakers

    Frank Bosco, Virginia Commonwealth University:
    "metaBUS: Summarizing and visualizing one million findings in psychology."

    Mike Cheung, National University of Singapore:
    "Bridging meta-analysis and standard statistical methods."

    Daniel Lakens, Eindhoven University of Technology:
    "On the reproducibility of meta-analyses."

    Wolfgang Viechtbauer, Maastricht University:
    "Meta-analytic models for multilevel, multivariate, temporal, and spatial data."

    Wim Van Den Noortgate, KU Leuven:
    "Using multilevel models for the meta-analysis of dependent effect sizes."

     

    The final program is now available!

    To view the final program of this conference, click here.

    Please find the abstract collection for all planned sessions here.

    For the final program of the associated conference Big Data in Psychology (June 7-9, 2018), click here.

    An associated conference on methods and applications using Big Data in Psychology will take place at ZPID - Leibniz Institute for Psychology Information in Trier, Germany, on June 7-9, 2018. For further details, click here.


    “Ad hoc” childcare for conference participants and presenters

    We have arranged for free childcare service for accompanying children of participants and presenters attending the “Big Data in Psychology” (June, 7-9, 2018) and/or “Research Synthesis” (June, 10-12, 2018) conference. During the conference hours, qualified care of the children will be provided by employees of the Caritas family services. Childcare is located at University of Trier, Campus I (student residence building IV; “ad hoc-Raum für Kinder”), about 10-15 minutes from the conference venue (walking distance).
    To sign up for this free service send an e-mail (events@leibniz-psychology.org) with your name and the number of children who will attend. Any questions that may arise can be directed to the same e-mail address.

     

    Registration fee

    Early Bird (Dec 15 until Apr 15): EUR 250.-

    Regular (Apr 16 until May 15): EUR 300.-

    Late (May 16 until June 7): EUR 350.-

    (Please note that there is a reduced registration fee option if you are presenting at this conference.)

Big Data in Psychology 2019

May 27-29, 2019, Dubrovnik, Croatia

Methods and applications using Big Data in Psychology are being addressed.

  • Big Data in Psychology 2019

    May 27, 2019 – May 29, 2019

    organized by the Leibniz Institute for Psychology Information (ZPID) at the
    Center for Advanced Academic Studies (CAAS), Dubrovnik, Croatia


    Associated special issue, to appear 2020 in Social Science Computer Review: Big Data in the Behavioral and Social Sciences.

    Associated conference, taking place May 29-31, 2019, at the same venue:
    Research Synthesis Methods 2019, http://researchsynthesis2019.leibniz-psychology.org

     

    Aims and Scope of the Conference

    The availability of Big Data is more and more common in many fields including business, computer science, government, social and behavioral sciences, and psychology. Since it is hard to clearly define what Big Data is, we do not impose a strict definition of Big Data in this conference.


    There are three key characteristics that may qualify data as Big Data, namely Volume, Velocity, and Variety. High-volume data refers to the size of the dataset is too large that may lead to problems with storage and analysis. High-velocity data means that the data come at a high rate and/or have to be processed within a short period of time (e.g., real-time and interactive processing). High-variety data are data consisting of many types of structured and unstructured data with a mix of text, pictures, videos, and numbers. Another characteristic for Big Data is the veracity, which indicates the importance of the quality (or truthfulness) of data. Some examples of Big Data that may be relevant for Psychology are social media data, health/physiological tracker data, geolocation data, dynamic public records, travel route data, behavioral and genetic data. Papers submitted to this conference may focus on one or more of these features in Big Data.


    The overall aim of this conference is to address methods and applications using Big Data in Psychology. The topics covered may address (but are not limited to):

    • Methodological and statistical issues in collecting, handling, processing, and analyzing Big Data in psychology.

    • Applications and illustrations of how Big Data are used to address psychological research questions.

    • Psychological interventions making use of Big Data.

    • Inference models taking Big Data into account.

    • Comparison of Big Data versus ´traditional´ data sources (e.g., self-reports, peer-reports, etc.).

    • Combining traditional data sources with Big Data.

    • Implications of Big Data for research infrastructures in psychology and related areas.


    Invited Keynote Speakers

    • Ross Jacobucci, University of Notre Dame
      “Flexible Specification of Large Structural Equation Models with Regularization”

    • Joop Hox, Utrecht University
      "Computational social and behavioral science methodology: Current issues in using big data"


    How to submit a proposal?

    Structured abstracts could be submitted until December 1, 2018.

    Submitted contributions are also eligible to be considered for a special issue of Social Science Computer Review  (“Big Data in the Behavioral and Social Sciences ”). When submitting your abstract, authors were be able to declare whether they would like their abstract to be considered for the conference only, or the special issue only, or both. The call for papers can be found here. Submitting a full paper for the special issue is optional for conference presenters.

    Deadlines

    Conference timeline

    Special issue timeline
    (Call for papers)

    Dec 1, 2018

    Structured abstracts due, to be submitted using this link.

    Dec 31, 2018

    Registration opens
    Invitations to present due

    Invitation to submit a full paper due

    Apr 30, 2019

    Submission of conference presentations due

    Full paper submission due

    May 29-31, 2019

    Conference in Dubrovnik

    Jul 15, 2019


    Feedback to authors of full papers due

    Aug 15, 2019

    Revised manuscripts due

    Aug 31, 2019

    Editorial decision about acceptance or refusal of revised papers due

    2020

    Publication of special issue


    Registration fees:

    Early Bird (Dec 31, 2018, until March 15, 2019):
    EUR 250.- for participants (without a presentation), EUR 150.- for presenters


    Regular (March 16, 2019, until April 15, 2019):
    EUR 300.- for participants (without a presentation), EUR 200.- for presenters


    Late (from April 16, 2019):

    EUR 350.- for participants (without a presentation), EUR 250.- for presenters


  • Big Data in Psychology 2018

    June 7, 2018 – June 9, 2018

    Leibniz Institute for Psychology Information (ZPID)

    Event location: University of Trier, Campus II - Kapelle (Please note that the university has two different campuses, we are at the second one!)

     

    The availability of Big Data is more and more common in many fields including business, computer science, government, social and behavioral sciences, and psychology. Since it is hard to clearly define what Big Data is, we do not impose a strict definition of Big Data in this conference.

    There are three key characteristics that may qualify data as Big Data, namely Volume, Velocity, and Variety. High-volume data refers to the size of the dataset is too large that may lead to problems with storage and analysis. High-velocity data means that the data come at a high rate and/or have to be processed within a short period of time (e.g., real-time and interactive processing). High-variety data are data consisting of many types of structured and unstructured data with a mix of text, pictures, videos, and numbers. Another characteristic for Big Data is the veracity, which indicates the importance of the quality (or truthfulness) of data. Some examples of Big Data that may be relevant for Psychology are social media data, health/physiological tracker data, geolocation data, dynamic public records, travel route data, behavioral and genetic data. Papers submitted to this conference may focus on one or more of these features in Big Data.

    The overall aim of this conference is to address methods and applications using Big Data in Psychology. The topics covered may address (but are not limited to):
    • Methodological and statistical issues in collecting, handling, processing, and analyzing Big Data in psychology.
    • Applications and illustrations of how Big Data are used to address psychological research questions.
    • Psychological interventions making use of Big Data.
    • Inference models taking Big Data into account.
    • Comparison of Big Data versus ´traditional´ data sources (e.g., self-reports, peer-reports, etc.).
    • Combining traditional data sources with Big Data.
    • Implications of Big Data for research infrastructures in psychology and related areas.

     

    Invited Keynote Speakers

    Mike Cheung, National University of Singapore:
    "Testing model driven hypotheses with Big Data."

    Katrijn van Deun, Tilburg University:
    "Big Data in Psychology: Statistical methods for linked high-dimensional with traditional data."

    Andreas Brandmaier, Max Planck Institute for Human Development:
    "The best of both worlds: Towards a synthesis of theory-based and data-driven modeling."

    Michael Neale, Virginia Commonwealth University:
    "Structural Equation Modeling of Big Data: Challenges and Opportunities."

    Fred Oswald, Rice University:
    "The Hype, Reality, and Hope for Big Data Analyses in Psychological Research."


    The final program is now available!

    To view the final program of the conference, click here.

    Please find the abstract collection for all planned sessions here.

    For the final program of the associated conference Research Synthesis (June 10-12, 2018), click here.

    An associated conference on hotspot topics in subfields and related fields of Psychology and their exploration through research synthesis methods will take place at ZPID - Leibniz Institute for Psychology Information in Trier, Germany, on June 10-12, 2018. For further details, click here.


    “Ad hoc” childcare for conference participants and presenters

    We have arranged for free childcare service for accompanying children of participants and presenters attending the “Big Data in Psychology” (June, 7-9, 2018) and/or “Research Synthesis” (June, 10-12, 2018) conference. During the conference hours, qualified care of the children will be provided by employees of the Caritas family services. Childcare is located at University of Trier, Campus I (student residence building IV; “ad hoc-Raum für Kinder”), about 10-15 minutes from the conference venue (walking distance).
    To sign up for this free service send an e-mail (events@leibniz-psychology.org) with your name and the number of children who will attend. Any questions that may arise can be directed to the same e-mail address.

     

    Registration fee

    Early Bird (Dec 15 until Apr 15): EUR 250.-

    Regular (Apr 16 until May 15): EUR 300.-

    Late (May 16 until June 7): EUR 350.-

    (Please note that there is a reduced registration fee option if you are presenting at this conference.)

Open Science 2019

March 12-14, 2019, Trier, Germany

Methodological and conceptual issues of the implementation of open science standards as a response to the replication crisis are discussed.

  • Open Science 2019

    March 12, 2019 – March 14, 2019

    Leibniz Institute for Psychology Information (ZPID)

    Event Location: University of Trier

     

    As a response to the replication crisis in psychology, the last six years witnessed the development and implementation of various standards of open science, most notably replicability projects, pre-registrations, registered reports, open data, reproducible scripts, as well as transparency and openness promotion guidelines for scientific journals. It is yet unclear to which extent the implementation of these methods have changed the way how psychological research is carried out and what we have learned so far about the stability and generalizability of psychological phenomena. The general goal of this conference is to give a relatively broad overview of
    • what has and what has not yet been achieved,
    • what are still prevailing problems, and
    • whether the aforementioned open science standards have led to new insights about psychological phenomena.

    Possible topics of conference presentations may include:

    Methodological and statistical issues such as:

    • What kind evidence for p-hacking, questionable research practices (QRPs) and HARKING (hypothesizing after the results are known) exists and what has possibily changed over the course of time?
    • What are methodological key features of successfully replicated studies and what can be learned from that?
    • To what extent do statistical corrections for publication bias and/or for effects of questionable research practices work?

    Conceptual issues such as:

    • Open science and journals: How and to which extent have open science standards changed journals' publication policies? Which types of open science requirements have mostly been implemented? How prevalent are open science requirements in psychological journals in general?
    • Quantifiable reactions of the field or subfields towards implemented changes. Examples: Studies on the number of articles with open data since these changes have been implemented. Studies on the differences among disciplines with respect to the speed of implementation of changes.
    • Effectiveness of open science: Do the claims of the open science movement hold up? We welcome metascience studies on the effectiveness of open science standards. For example, is there evidence that the implementation of open science standards has led to an increase of statistical power (frequentist statistics) or more evidence (Bayesian statistics)? To which degree do preregistered studies actually follow the preregistered design and analysis?


    The adjunctive topical issue of the Zeitschrift für Psychologie will be published open access and be permanently free for everyone to read and download at the journal's website.

    How to submit a proposal

    There is a two-stage submissions process. Initially, interested authors are requested to submit extended abstracts of their proposed papers to the Zeitschrift für Psychologie. Authors of the selected abstracts will then be invited to submit full papers. All papers will undergo blind peer review.
    Stage 1: Structured Abstract Submission
    Authors interested in the Zeitschrift für Psychologie's special issue must submit a structured abstract of the planned manuscript before submitting a full paper. The goal is to provide authors with prompt feedback regarding the suitability and relevance of the planned manuscript to the special issue.

    The deadline for submitting structured abstracts was August 15
    , 2018.

    Feedback on whether or not the editors encourage authors to submit a full paper was given by September 15, 2018.

    Submission guidelines for structured abstracts:
    Structured abstracts should be within four pages and may encompass information on each of the following headings:
    (a) Background,
    (b) Objectives,
    (c) Research question(s) and/or hypothesis/es,
    (d) Method/Approach,
    (e) Results/Findings,
    (f) Conclusions and implications (expected).
    Structured abstracts should be submitted by e-mail to the two guest editors Frank Renkewitz and Moritz Heene at frank.renkewitz@uni-erfurt.de and heene@psy.lmu.de.

    Further information can be found here:

Identifying the Determinants of (Non-)Replicability: The Theory of Planned Behavior

October 17-19, 2018, Trier, Germany

The overall aim of this conference is to present and to discuss contributions aimed at empirically identifying the factors rendering psychological theories replicable. The focus will be on the theory of planned behavior (TPB; Ajzen, 1985, 1991, 2012).

  • Identifying the Determinants of (Non-)Replicability: The Theory of Planned Behavior

    October 17, 2018 – October 19, 2018

    organized by the Leibniz Institute for Psychology Information (ZPID)
    Event location: University of Trier, Building P, Room P 12

     

    An associated special issue will appear in 2020 in Europe's Journal of Psychology.
    For further details, see: https://goo.gl/wMwtpN

    The overall aim of this conference is to present and to discuss contributions aimed at empirically identifying the factors rendering psychological theories replicable. Because of the large number of replications available, having resulted in more than 40 meta-analytic syntheses, the focus will be on the theory of planned behavior (TPB; Ajzen, 1985, 1991, 2012). Tentative schedule:


    Day 1 (October 17, 2018, starting at 10:00 am):
    The Theory of Planned Behavior: Past, present and future

    • Keynote talk by Icek Ajzen, University of Amherst:
      Doing the Same Thing Over and Over Again and Expecting Different Results:  Replication in the Theory of Planned Behavior”

    • Talks about recent applications of the TPB by:

      • Francesco La Barbera, Federico II University of Naples:
        “Control interactions in the theory of planned behavior”

      • Jost Reinecke, University of Bielefeld:
        “Applications of the theory of planned behavior (TPB) and the situational action theory (SAT) in the context of criminological research”

      • Martin S. Hagger, Curtin University and University of Jyväskylä:
        “Testing the Theory of Planned Behavior and Reasoned Action Approach: A Meta-Analytic Structural Equation Modeling Approach”

    • Keynote talk by Peter Schmidt, University of Giessen:
      “Meta-analyses of the theory of planned behavior”

     

    Day 2 (October 18, 2018):

    Workshop given by Icek Ajzen and Peter Schmidt

    • Central features of the TPB:  The principle of compatibility; interaction and mediation assumptions.

    • Using SEM to establish convergent and discriminant validity of TPB measures; measurement invariance.

    • SEM test of the structural model: mediation, moderation and changes over time.

    • The TPB as a framework for behavior change interventions.  Results from meta-analyses.

    • Using SEM to assess the impact of an intervention.  Mimic Models and Multiple Group SEM

     

    Day 3 (October 19, 2018, until 12:00 pm):
    Theory of Planned Behavior Hackathon

    Please bring your own computer to participate in the hackathon!

    • Developing pre-registered replications of past primary studies applying the TPB to any substantive domain identifying the conditions that promote or inhibit replicability of findings.

    • Developing pre-registered systematic reviews and meta-analytic syntheses of TPB studies identifying the determinants of the (non-)replicability of the TPB.

     

    A detailed conference program including the scheduled talks and sessions is now available:

    Conference Program

     

    Registration fees

    Registration is free of charge for employees of ZPID and for students/employees of the University of Trier. Please request a registration voucher by e-mail ( events@leibniz-psychology.org ).

    For all other participants, the following rates apply:

    Early Bird (until Sept 20, 2018): 150 EUR

    Regular (Sept 21 until Oct 3, 2018): 200 EUR

    Late (Oct 4 until Oct 10, 2018): 350 EUR

Registered Reports Workshop 2018

January 25-26, 2018, Trier, Germany

This workshop has been moved to the archive. Conference presentations are available.

A workshop to discuss the potential of pre-registration and different registered reports implementation variants with international experts, publishers, and representatives of research service infrastructures.

  • Registered Reports Workshop 2018

    January 25, 2018 – January 26, 2018

    Leibniz Institute for Psychology Information (ZPID)

    Event location: University of Trier, Campus I
    1 PM, January 25th (Room C9) - 12 PM, January 26th (Room HS8)


    ‘Registered Reports’ offer a publication approach to the psychological scientific community that emphasizes the importance of the research question and the quality of the methodology prior to data collection.

    The format requires authors of empirical studies to preregister their study protocol including hypotheses, details concerning sample size and sampling methods, and the analysis plan. The submission of an empirical study outline is followed by a standard peer review process determining the quality of research methodology. If the study is accepted as a ‘Registered Report’, publication is granted to the authors irrespective of the outcomes. This publication process seeks to prevent questionable research practices such as low statistical power, changing hypotheses retrospectively to fit obtained data (“HARKing”), selective reporting of results, manipulation of methods and criteria of analysis (“p-hacking”), and publication bias. The publication format of ‘Registered Reports’ thus rewards adhering to the hypothetico-deductive model of the scientific method, while allowing complete flexibility in conducting and reporting additional exploratory (unregistered post-hoc) analyses. ‘Registered Reports’ promote the trustworthiness and replicability of psychological research - two essential goals of the Open Science movement.

    In order to establish ‘Registered Reports’ and pre-registration of empirical studies in the scientific community, it is essential to develop and offer an infrastructure that fulfils the needs of the research community in psychology. This workshop addressed and discussed the following questions:

    • How can authors be encouraged to preregister their studies (reward system)?
    • What are potential tools and guidelines to support authors to preregister their studies (e.g., submission forms, best practice examples and resources)?
    • How shall the submission process for preregistered studies look like ideally?
    • What happens if authors have to deviate from the preregistered methodology?
    • Which basic principles, procedures, and guidelines should publishers follow?

    Potential implementation models were presented and discussed with regard to their advantages and disadvantages.

     

    Invited Keynote Speakers

    • Michael Bosnjak and Erich Weichselgartner, Leibniz Institute for Psychology Information (ZPID), which is hosting the journal 'Registered Reports in Psychology'.

     

    To view the final program of the workshop, click here.

     

     

    Workshop materials:

    Workshop overview & information

    Keynote Talk Chris Chambers: Video / Slides

    Chris Chambers at ZPID: Registered Reports as a vaccine against research bias

    Keynote Talk Joseph Cesario: Video

    Joseph Cesario at ZPID: A view of peer-reviewed preregistration from CRSP

    This event was sponsored by the Leibniz Research Alliance Science 2.0